Bell Jars and Bones

It’s October and the nights are drawing in and it’s starting to get spooky out with Halloween looming around the corner. Saying that I’ve been working on a new project involving bones. Bones are cool right, people like dead things? I know I do. I’ve been toying with this idea around in my mind for a while and here’s what I’ve been up to.

I find skulls and bones slightly fascinating. These things are inside of us but we never really get to see them. I find real beauty in the way the light bounces off and creates a contrast between the shadow and the bone.

I’ve touched on using skulls/death in previous projects. In college one of my art projects was primarily based around a ram’s skull and a photography project recreating crime scenes. You might think these things are repulsive and wonder why anyone would want to work with skulls. But I like that juxtaposition between death and beauty. 

The inspiration for this project comes from my interest in taxidermy. I have roe deer skulls mounted on to my wall and have framed butterflies and a moth. I find deers to be beautiful creatures and stag horns represent such strength. Moths and butterflies can have such wonderful colouring on their wings that we don’t always see. I don’t think we realise the beauty in this world until it’s either too late or, we’re just not paying any attention to our surroundings. As a species I think that we are selfish, we don’t care or maintain this world like we should, but decided to destroy it instead (but that’s completely off topic). 

I’m also obsessed with nature and trying to capture this everlasting moment to display in your home.

The concept for this project is to design something that you wouldn’t find in the high streets, a product that is completely original and bespoke. I also want to create something that is preserved and isn’t disposable. With my obsession to capture miniature worlds and the juxtaposition of using materials that were once alive to then, in a sense, now dead.

I want to be able to merge them together, something everlasting. As soon as I thought of this, my memory jumped back to my childhood. I immediately thought of Bristol Museum’s crumbling Victorian taxidermy display and glass containers with taxidermy birds of prey in mid flight arranged to look like it was alive. Why not that, but just the bones? And, instead of being in a glass box, surrounded by nothing or by something that has faded. Why not capture the bones in a more natural habitat. This is where the preserved moss comes in.

Preserved moss is, you guessed it, moss that is brought back to life. Well, actually it’s grown, harvested, then dehydrated (or a bio chemical is used), and then dyed. So pretty much everything that is in this project was once alive and is now… dead. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m now in the process of gathering materials to make more prototypes, I’ve created a couple already (as pictured above) but it’s definitely a work in progress. But I hope that I will be able to release a couple of pieces for Halloween. Keep your eyes peeled to our Instagram @loofterrariums, for progress and when they will be available. I’d also love to hear your feedback, leave a message in the comments below. I’ll be posting to my blog regularly and updating any projects on social media, this way to Facebook.